Procurement Project of the Year

Procurement Project of the Year

The NHS is desperate to make savings – without affecting quality - through better procurement. Lord Carter’s productivity review of acute hospitals highlighted the potential for substantial savings through improved procurement and there has been considerable central pressure on NHS organisations to get to grips with this and start making savings.

Better procurement is not just about the money. Many who work in the area recognise that even if the spend is the same, improved procurement may offer better value for money by buying better goods or services for the same price or buying a produce whose lifetime costs are lower or value is greater.

Procurement support services can help, and this award will go to one which is delivering tangible improvements through a service, technology or consultancy project. These improvements may be to cost or quality and safety for patients – or both. The support or service will have helped deliver something which the NHS trust could not have done on its own.

Eligibility

  • Entrants will be a business which has delivered substantial value through improved procurement processes working in partnership with an NHS organisation
  • Judges are looking for single projects with specific NHS bodies who can demonstrate positive and joint working with results delivered in the past two years up until the awards entry deadline
  • Projects could be related to transforming procurement services, spend management services or technology or supply chain management
     

Criteria :

Ambition

  • Outline the scope of work including the depth and breadth of the procurement project, the timeframe and desired targets.
  • What was the context of purchasing previously and why was a new procurement approach needed?
  • What methodology was employed and was this adapted from best practice procurement from another sector or industry or was it developed in-house?

Outcomes

  • How has the project improved procurement for the NHS organisation?
  • What have been the benefits in terms of savings, purchasing power, supplier engagement and value.
  • What innovative and contemporary procurement techniques have been employed to leverage best value for the organisation.
  • Although judges will be looking at savings if relevant, other measures of success that should be evidenced might include supplier led innovation, process improvements and spend management capabilities.

Spread

  • How has the partnership spread procurement best practice?
  • What steps have been taken to engage with other teams within or outside the NHS organisation that have led to improvements in purchasing.
  • Judges are looking for evidence that achievements have been disseminated to other institutions or have the potential of saving money or improving processes elsewhere.

Involvement

  • How has the partnership collaborated with end-users within the NHS organisation?
  • Describe the engagement process, how were affected parties approached, what level of influence have they had on the partnership and proposed changes?
  • Describe any collaborative working which led to the success of project and how each party has consequentially benefited.

Value

  • Has the project resulted in savings for the NHS organisation?
  • What other measures of value have been considered outside of monetary benefits?
  • Judges are looking for projects which can demonstrate greater supplier engagement, collaborative working between procurement and end-user teams, greater purchasing power, innovative solutions to streamline process and transparency in spend.
  • Judges will be considering projects which have had a beneficial effect on front line staff, patients and the way they deliver services.

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